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SCIENCE MATTERS: AUTUMN 2015

We have a varied and exciting programme of science lectures for the Autumn with several well known and national experts  who are regular contributors to radio and newspapers on current science topics. 

SEPT 21 - OUR LIGHT MATERIALS: 
PROF HOWARD COLQUHOUN, 
CHAIR OF MATERIALS SCIENCE, READING UNIVERSITY 
We have always sought new materials with better properties and processability. Stone was superseded by bronze,iron to steel ,aluminum,titanium and a wide range of other metals and alloys. Materials are now based on the chemistry of carbon leading to nylon, polyethylene, polyester and synthetic rubber. Research in polymer chemistry has led to new materials such as Kevlar which is as strong as steel but 4 or 5 times lighter. This talk will explore the science and latest research in this field. 
 
SEPT 28 - HUMAN PAIN PERCEPTION AND TREATMENT:
PROFESSOR ANTHONY JONES, MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY 
Prof Jones leads the human pain research group at Manchester University and pioneered the development of techniques to understand pain perception and use these insights to help relieve chronic pain. 
 
OCT 5 - NUCLEAR ENERGY - FRIEND OR FOE?:
PROFESSOR FRANCIS LIVENS, INTERIM DIRECTOR,
DALTON NUCLEAR INSTITUTE, MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY 
Nuclear energy has been controversial from its very beginnings over 50 years ago, with concerns over accidents, waste and nuclear weapons. However as global energy demand increases through population growth and development, and concerns about climate change grow, driven by burning of fossil fuels, nuclear energy is becoming more attractive. This talk will discuss the reasons behind the 'nuclear renaissance' and what this might mean for the UK over the next 50 years. 
 
OCT 12 - PUTTING SUNSHINE IN THE TANK: 
USING NANOTECHNOLOGY TO HARVEST SUNLIGHT: 
PROFESSOR WENDY FLAVELL, PROFESSOR OF SURFACE PHYSICS, 
MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY 
The sun provides far more energy than we will ever need but we use it very inefficiently. Research into harvesting sunlight using small semiconductors clusters called quantum dots ,containing only a few hundred atoms will be described. When the light is absorbed carriers of electric current are created as in solar panels but with more current than a conventional cell. However the quantum dots are not yet stable enough for use over long periods The research is trying to solve this problem. 
 
Oct 19 - Sonic Wonderland: Professor Trevor Cox, Professor of Acoustics Salford University
What are the sonic wonders of the world? Trevor Cox a renowned acoustics professor who engineers classrooms and concert halls now revels in exotic noises.
- creaking glaciers,whispering galleries,musical roads, seals that sound like alien Angels and a Mayan pyramid that chirps like a bird. With forays into archaeology ,biology and design the talk will explain how sound is made and altered by the environment and how our body reacts to peculiar noises. Trevor encourages us to become better listeners and open our ears to the cacophony around us.
 
Nov 2 - Bioengineering at Manchester - Solving problems from cells to insoles: Professor Parthasarathi Mandal Manchester University Nov 9 Building the human brain on computers: Professor Steve Furber Manchester University
The inner workings of the brain remain one of the great mysteries of science. How does this organ upon which we all depend so critically perform its vital functions? The Spinnaker project at Manchester University aims to contribute to unravelling the secrets of the brain by building a computer with a million mobile phone processors for real time brain-modeling applications, though even a million processors gets us to only 1% of the scale of the human brain!
 
Nov 9 - Building the human brain on computers: Professor Steve Furber Manchester University
The inner workings of the brain remain one of the great mysteries of science. How does this organ upon which we all depend so critically perform its vital functions? The Spinnaker project at Manchester University aims to contribute to unravelling the secrets of the brain by building a computer with a million mobile phone processors for real time brain-modeling applications, though even a million processors gets us to only 1% of the scale of the human brain!

Nov 16 - Climate Change and how we tackle it: Professor Kevin Anderson Manchester University

Nov 23 - Clouds,climate change and pollution: Professor Tom Choularton Manchester University
Prof Choularton is a renowned expert on atmospheric physics, cloud formation and pollution dispersal modelling.
This talk will discuss how clouds form referring to the latest research. Also it will consider how clouds can both reduce global warming and also increase global warming depending on their altitude and formation. Atmospheric conditions can also affect the level of pollution and this is discussed.
 
Nov 30 - The House of Murder - The Christie investigation and the emergence of forensics in post war England: Dr Ian Burney Director of Manchester University's Centre for the History of Science,Technology and Medicine
This talk uses the notorious case of the serial murderer John Christie (1953)to explore English homicide investigation in mid 20th century.The case enables an examination of the ways murder investigation was changed by new approaches to the crime scene and developments in lab based analysis of crime scene objects. Led by the pathologist Francis Camps, Christies home became a macabre excavation site and the scene for a prolonged and meticulous search for forensic evidence which led the way for current forensic science investigation.
Venue Wilmslow GuildWilmslow Guild
Day Monday
Time 19:30 - 21:30
Tutor David Gane

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